Arizona legislators, Trump attorneys plan Phoenix assembly on election

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Arizona lawmakers and lawyers for President Donald Trump will hold a meeting at a downtown Phoenix hotel on Monday to discuss the election as they continue to deny his defeat earlier this month.

Arizona lawmakers and lawyers for President Donald Trump will hold a meeting at a downtown Phoenix hotel on Monday to discuss the election as they continue to deny his defeat earlier this month.

The gathering can bring Trump supporters together and deploy counter programs the same morning the Secretary of State is due to confirm President-elect Joe Biden’s victory in Arizona. However, it is unclear how much lawmakers could do about the outcome of the race.

During the Trump campaign andStatusThe Republican Party has filed election lawsuits in Maricopa County, has produced no evidence of fraud, and so far judges have dismissed the cases.

Republic governor Doug Ducey said earlier this week he trusted the state’s electoral system after holding back to acknowledge Biden won the state, citing ongoing legal proceedings.

“I’ve said several times: Arizona is a good government state,” Ducey said on Tuesday. “I trust our voting system. Our voting system is of integrity. Joe Biden won Arizona.”

Even so, Rep. Mark Finchem, R-Oro Valley, when he announced he would take the chair on Monday, said his “worst fears have come to light” after “investigating possible fraudulent and illegal activities through ours.” 2020 elections could have been affected “.

No legislative hearing

The meeting at the Hyatt Regency in downtown Phoenix is ​​not a legislative hearing as the Finchem and Trump campaign legal team has cast.

State legislation is not in session. The Speaker of the House of Representatives and the President of the Senate President may convene committee meetings between sessions, but did not approve the event.

Finchem said he applied for approval to a meeting of the House Federal Relations Committee a few weeks ago, which he chairs, but has not received approval from the House leadership.

Jenna Ellis, an attorney for the president, wrote Friday that she would be in attendance with Rudy Giuliani, the most prominent figure in the Trump campaign's legal effort.  The invitation, however, stated that the President's legal team would be

“After checking the statistical anomalies, there are numbers to be counted [sic]We have decided, as members of the legislature, rather than as members of any particular committee, that affidavits of improper conduct and outrage in the community arose from what appeared to be an attempt by voters to throw the election through a series of fraudulent efforts that we should hold a public hearing perform, ”Finchem wrote in a press release.

Jenna Ellis, an attorney for the president, wrote on Friday that she would be in attendance with Rudy Giuliani, the most prominent figure in the Trump campaign’s legal effort. However, the invitation stated that the president’s legal team would be “in attendance from DC,” suggesting that at least some of the attendees may videoconferenced.

The event takes place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., with a one-hour lunch break at 12 p.m. Attendance was limited due to COVID-19 and tickets for the public were fully booked as of Friday afternoon. Finchem’s press release states that the event will be streamed online.

The aim is to call a special legislative term, but what then?

A public invitation for the event in Phoenix states: “The aim is to collect evidence that justifies calling a special session to reflect on what has happened and take appropriate action immediately.”

It remains unclear what lawmakers could do about the presidential election. It is also unclear whether they could convince Ducey to convene a special session or bring Democrats on board to get the majority needed to convene a special session without the governor’s approval.

The US Constitution gives lawmakers the task of deciding how the state’s presidential elections are elected. But Arizona law mandated voters to select those voters on election day.

A “treacherous voter” provision in state law, backed by Republicans, requires voters to cast their votes for the presidential candidate who wins the most votes in the state.

Senate Republicans called on lawmakers this month for an opinion on the matter. The answer: Legislators would have to change these laws to change the way presidential elections are appointed.

Even then, it is believed, the changes may not apply to this election because voters have already chosen voters at the ballot box.

Contact Andrew Oxford at [email protected] or on Twitter at @andrewboxford.

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