California Voters Increase Industrial Hashish Alternatives Throughout the State: Half I

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california cannabis

This year’s election day proved to be a great step forward in terms of drug policy reform. Arizona, Montana, New Jersey and South Dakota legalized adult cannabis, Mississippi legalized medical cannabis, Washington DC decriminalized a variety of psychedelic plants, and Oregon is a leader in legalizing psilocybin for therapeutic use and decriminalizing the non-commercial possession of ALL controlled substances.

But here in California at least thirty-five cities and counties also voted on cannabis-related issues, and those polls have been largely successful. As Marijuana Business Daily noted in their review of successful initiatives, “As of June, only 168 of California’s 540 cities and counties allowed any form of legal MJ retail, and many of them allow non-adult retail medical” and throughout California there are currently only about 700 retailers, which is arguably completely insufficient.

In this two-part series of posts, we provide an overview of what happened to cannabis in this year’s local elections and how this in some countries could pave the way for new commercial cannabis opportunities across California.

Artesia: Measure Q.

Voters in Artesia, a suburb of Los Angeles County, voted to approve a marijuana business tax of 15% of gross receipts and $ 20 per square foot for cultivation. Proponents of the measure estimated these taxes could generate revenues of $ 200,000 to $ 400,000 annually for city services.

Prohibition: Measure L.

Voters in Banning, Riverside County approved a tax of up to 10% on marijuana distribution facilities to provide an estimated $ 20,289 to $ 405,790 per year for general urban services.

Benicia: Measure D.

Voters in the Bay Area town of Benicia agreed that new marijuana dispensaries should be allowed in the town. Measure D was put on the ballot as a non-binding, consultative question, with no local laws being changed.

Calaveras County: Measure G.

Voters in Calaveras County approved a new tax structure that set a maximum tax on marijuana activities that would not exceed $ 7.00 per square foot for acreage and 8% of revenue for other marijuana activities, and an estimated 1.5 to $ 3 million generated annually for local use.

Calabasas: Measure SB

Voters in Calabasas approved a cannabis tax structure and approved a 10% tax on marijuana businesses that generate an estimated $ 10,000 a year to fund city services.

Trade: Measure SB

Commerce voters opposed a move that would have approved six marijuana business development agreements between city officials and businesses.

Costa Mesa: Measure Q.

Voters paved the way for the city of Costa Mesa to allow commercial cannabis retail stores by approving a measure that puts a 4% to 7% gross income tax on marijuana retail businesses that generate an estimated $ 3 million annually for city services, as well the regulation of marijuana business locations.

Encinitas: Measure H.

Voters voted for Encinitas city to authorize commercial cannabis activities, including retail sales, cultivation and manufacturing with certain restrictions. Encinitas currently bans all commercial cannabis activity.

Fairfield: Measure C.

Fairfield voters approved a marijuana business tax of 6% gross receipts for retail businesses, 4% gross receipts for other businesses, and $ 10 per square foot for cultivation, generating an estimated $ 237,500 to $ 360,000 annually.

Grass Valley: Measure N.

Grass Valley voters approved a gross income tax of 8% for retailers, a gross income tax of 6% for other businesses, and a cultivation tax of up to $ 7 per square foot.

Hawthorne: Measure CC

Hawthorne voters approved a 5% tax on marijuana businesses that do not generate income until Hawthorne marijuana businesses are approved.

Jurupa Valley: Measure U.

Voters in Jurupa Valley opposed a measure that would increase the number of licensed retailers in the city from seven to nine and increase taxes on cannabis companies.

King City: Measure P.

King City voters approved a tax of up to 5% of gross receipts on sales of marijuana and marijuana products and up to 2% of gross receipts on sales of marijuana and marijuana products from outside King City, which is an estimated $ 150,000 generate per year.

Laguna Woods: Measure V.

Voters in Laguna Woods agreed that marijuana dispensaries should be approved for retail sales of medical and non-medical marijuana within city limits. Measure V was put on the ballot as a non-binding, advisory question without the local laws being changed.

La Habra: Measure W.

Voters in La Habra approved permits for up to four marijuana delivery companies and a gross income tax of up to 6% for commercial marijuana companies that spend an estimated $ 1 to 2 million per year on general services like emergency response, public safety, fighting Homelessness and seniors generate programs, open space conservation, and small businesses.

Lemon Grove: Measure J.

Voters in Lemon Grove, near San Diego, approved a tax on marijuana retail stores of up to 8% and other marijuana stores of up to 4% of gross revenues, which have estimated sales between $ 560,000 and $ 1.12 million generated per year for general urban services.

Madera: Measure R.

Madera voters approved a marijuana business tax of 6% of gross receipts for retail businesses, 4% of gross receipts for other marijuana businesses, and no more than $ 10 per square foot for cultivation, making an estimated $ 720,000 – 1.08 Million USD are generated annually. Madera currently bans commercial cannabis activities.

Marina: Measure Z.

Marina voters approved restrictions on marijuana stores close to parks and recreational centers, maintained a 5% gross income tax on marijuana stores and capped three adult retailers and three medical pharmacies, and continued to prohibit the sale of recreational products to anyone under the age of 21 Years.

Marysville: Measure N.

Voters in Marysville approved a tax on marijuana businesses of 6% of gross receipts for retail, 4% of gross receipts for other marijuana businesses, and $ 10 per square foot for cultivation, bringing an estimated $ 300,000 to $ 470,000 per year for municipal Services were generated including law enforcement, fire services, roads and recreation.

Mount Shasta: Measure L.

Mount Shasta voters opposed a move that would have approved regulations and licensing requirements for industrial marijuana companies.

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We’ll cover the rest of the cannabis-related election results here in California in the next installment in this two-part series of posts.