COVID-19 hitting Allegheny County court docket staff, attorneys

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COVID-19 hitting Allegheny County court employees, attorneys

Corona virus spreads through Allegheny County's judicial system, infects employees, and closes a district court. According to court administrator Christopher Connors, six court employees and two lawyers working in court were diagnosed with the virus. A spokesman for the Allegheny County Sheriff's Office said a civil servant who works in the courthouse has done positive tests. On Tuesday, Connors said there are two new positive tests in the judicial system. Another at Pittsburgh Municipal Court and another at a probation office. The prosecutor and the prosecutor were informed of the results on Tuesday. In consultation with the judges, President Judge Clark said that from Wednesday to July 17, many if not all ADAs will take part in court events virtually. Clark said the goal is not only to reduce traffic in the courthouse, but also to force people to familiarize themselves with distance listening. On Monday, Penn Hills District Court saw signs that it was closed for two weeks. Callers received this message: "Due to caution, Penn Hills District Court will be closed." But the reason for the closure was never disclosed to the public – a clerk came down with COVID-19. Only when Action News asked Investigates, Connors announced this fact: "Our concerns are a lack of transparency," said defense lawyer Patrick Nightingale. He said court officials are closely connected to the legal community regarding coronavirus cases among court employees. "Are we unwittingly, possibly unwittingly taking this virus to other courthouses, other areas of the Commonwealth? We just don't know." Over the weekend, Nightingale posted on Facebook that "numerous employees, prosecutors, and lawyers were either diagnosed or quarantined put ". The public prosecutor said Monday that three of her employees had the virus. "I literally reported on social media out of fear and despair. Why doesn't anyone tell us what's going on?" In response, Connors said, "The court goes beyond the CDC's" close contact "guidelines and each situation is assessed on a case-by-case basis, taking all circumstances into account … to determine who stays at home and who is notified "Connors said he is working on a plan to ensure that lawyers are notified when the court personnel test positive for the virus. Nightingale said he welcomed this plan.

Corona virus spreads through Allegheny County's judicial system, infects employees, and closes a district court.

Court administrator Christopher Connors said the virus was diagnosed in six court employees and two lawyers working in court. A spokesman for the Allegheny County Sheriff's Office said a civil servant who works in the courthouse has done positive tests.

On Tuesday, Connors said there are two new positive tests in the judicial system. Another at Pittsburgh Municipal Court and another at a probation office.

The prosecutor and the prosecutor were informed of the results on Tuesday. After speaking to the judges, President Judge Clark said that from Wednesday to July 17, many if not all ADAs will take part in court events virtually. Clark said the goal is not only to reduce traffic in the courthouse, but also to force people to familiarize themselves with distance listening.

On Monday, Penn Hills District Court saw signs that it was closed for two weeks.

Callers received the following message: "Due to the great caution, the Penn Hills District Court is being closed." Nowhere was the public informed of the reason for the closure – a clerk came down with COVID-19.

It was only when Action News asked Investigates that Connors revealed this fact.

"Our concern is lack of transparency," said defense lawyer Patrick Nightingale.

He said court officials were closely connected to the legal community regarding coronavirus cases among court employees.

"Are we unknowingly and possibly unwittingly taking this virus to other courthouses, other areas of the Commonwealth? We just don't know," he said.

Over the weekend, Nightingale posted on Facebook that "numerous employees, prosecutors, and lawyers were either diagnosed or quarantined themselves."

The public prosecutor said Monday that three of her employees had the virus.

"I literally reported on social media out of fear and despair. Why doesn't anyone tell us what's going on?"

In response, Connors said, "The court goes beyond the CDC's" close contact "guidelines and each situation is assessed on a case-by-case basis, taking all circumstances into account … to determine who is at home stay and who should be notified. "

Connors said he is working on a plan to ensure that lawyers are notified if the court personnel test positive for the virus. Nightingale said he welcomed this plan.