Nothing to counsel rival gangs concerned in dying of Pitasoni Ulavalu, bikie lawyer tells court docket | The Canberra Instances

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Nothing to suggest rival gangs involved in death of Pitasoni Ulavalu, bikie lawyer tells court | The Canberra Times

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A lawyer for several Canberra Comancheros has sought to quell fears of a tit-for-tat bikie war, telling a court there was nothing to suggest rival gangs were involved in the death of local chapter commander Pitasoni Ulavalu. Mr Ulavalu, 48, was fatally stabbed in a fight at Kokomo’s in Civic last weekend, sparking fears of rising tensions among outlaw motorcycle gangs. Police have not yet arrested or charged anyone with the killing. The slain bikie boss’s second-in-command and likely successor, Aofangatuku Fatefehi Finau Langi, was refused bail in the ACT Supreme Court on Thursday, after police and prosecutors expressed concerns he would orchestrate reprisal attacks if released. Mr Langi, 31, is awaiting trial on nine charges laid following an incident in November last year. Another Comanchero, Jaymie Leam Turner, appeared in the Magistrates Court on Friday to seek bail after being locked up on charges of affray and threatening to kill a police officer. Police allege a “highly agitated” Turner arrived at Kokomo’s early on Sunday morning, after Mr Ulavalu had been stabbed, and tried to breach a cordon. He is accused of pushing a police officer and punching an unidentified man in the face outside the Civic nightspot, before being arrested. At the ACT Watch House, he allegedly threatened to shoot a police officer and “f— up” that officer’s family. Turner is yet to plead to the charges, and was refused bail on Monday. When he made a second attempt at bail on Friday, prosecutor Katrina Marson opposed the application. Ms Marson said Turner was subject to a good behaviour order for a different affray that had also been committed in the context of Comanchero gang activity, and that his alleged actions early on Sunday morning represented “an escalation” in offending. She said the alleged threats towards the police officer should be considered credible, given Turner had a history of violence towards police and easier access to guns than most on account of his gang membership. Ms Marson called evidence from Constable Daniel Raiser, who told the court police held “grave concerns” the Canberra Comancheros would seek retribution against whoever they believed to be responsible for Mr Ulavalu’s death. READ MORE: Constable Raiser said police were worried that members of the public may “come in between” warring bikies. He also said officers were worried Turner would fail to appear in court given his alleged breach of a good behaviour order would lead to a more severe sentence if convicted of the most recent charges. Turner’s lawyer, Peter Bevan, suggested no other bikie gangs were involved in Mr Ulavalu’s death and there was therefore no reason for retribution against rivals. Mr Bevan also represents Mr Langi and previously acted for other Comancheros, including Mr Ulavalu. He said a bikie who received a laceration to the leg in the incident at Kokomo’s had indicated that he did not recognise the other people involved in the fight, which would suggest they were not rival gang members. Mr Bevan said Turner had previously shown he could comply with bail conditions, having done so with no breaches for about a year on previous charges. He said concerns about the officer who was allegedly threatened could be ameliorated with bail conditions preventing Turner from approaching the officer or the ACT Watch House. Mr Bevan suggested Turner had become upset at the Watch House when the officer said words to the effect of: “Your mate’s died. Too bad. You won’t see him again.” But Ms Marson said the alleged threats appeared to have been sparked by Turner being told he would not receive police bail. READ MORE: Magistrate Bernadette Boss refused bail on Friday, noting the situation following Mr Ulavalu’s death was “a highly volatile one”. She accepted Turner’s alleged threats to the police officer should be considered credible and expressed concerns about his ease of access to guns. It was also worrying, Dr Boss said, that Turner did not appear to have been deterred on the weekend by his good-behaviour order. “It appears the defendant has been unable to control his temper in an emotional situation,” she said. Turner is due back in court on August 6. READ MORE:

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July 24 2020 – 1:30PM

A lawyer for several Canberra Comancheros has sought to quell fears of a tit-for-tat bikie war, telling a court there was nothing to suggest rival gangs were involved in the death of local chapter commander Pitasoni Ulavalu.

Police have not yet arrested or charged anyone with the killing.

Canberra Comanchero sergeant-at-arms Aofangatukau Fatafehi Finau Langi. Picture: ACT Policing

Mr Langi, 31, is awaiting trial on nine charges laid following an incident in November last year.

Another Comanchero, Jaymie Leam Turner, appeared in the Magistrates Court on Friday to seek bail after being locked up on charges of affray and threatening to kill a police officer.

Police allege a “highly agitated” Turner arrived at Kokomo’s early on Sunday morning, after Mr Ulavalu had been stabbed, and tried to breach a cordon.

He is accused of pushing a police officer and punching an unidentified man in the face outside the Civic nightspot, before being arrested.

At the ACT Watch House, he allegedly threatened to shoot a police officer and “f— up” that officer’s family.

Jaymie Leam Turner outside the ACT Magistrates Court in February. Picture: Blake Foden

Jaymie Leam Turner outside the ACT Magistrates Court in February. Picture: Blake Foden

When he made a second attempt at bail on Friday, prosecutor Katrina Marson opposed the application.

Ms Marson said Turner was subject to a good behaviour order for a different affray that had also been committed in the context of Comanchero gang activity, and that his alleged actions early on Sunday morning represented “an escalation” in offending.

She said the alleged threats towards the police officer should be considered credible, given Turner had a history of violence towards police and easier access to guns than most on account of his gang membership.

Ms Marson called evidence from Constable Daniel Raiser, who told the court police held “grave concerns” the Canberra Comancheros would seek retribution against whoever they believed to be responsible for Mr Ulavalu’s death.

Constable Raiser said police were worried that members of the public may “come in between” warring bikies.

He also said officers were worried Turner would fail to appear in court given his alleged breach of a good behaviour order would lead to a more severe sentence if convicted of the most recent charges.

Turner’s lawyer, Peter Bevan, suggested no other bikie gangs were involved in Mr Ulavalu’s death and there was therefore no reason for retribution against rivals.

Mr Bevan also represents Mr Langi and previously acted for other Comancheros, including Mr Ulavalu.

He said a bikie who received a laceration to the leg in the incident at Kokomo’s had indicated that he did not recognise the other people involved in the fight, which would suggest they were not rival gang members.

Mr Bevan said Turner had previously shown he could comply with bail conditions, having done so with no breaches for about a year on previous charges.

He said concerns about the officer who was allegedly threatened could be ameliorated with bail conditions preventing Turner from approaching the officer or the ACT Watch House.

Mr Bevan suggested Turner had become upset at the Watch House when the officer said words to the effect of: “Your mate’s died. Too bad. You won’t see him again.”

But Ms Marson said the alleged threats appeared to have been sparked by Turner being told he would not receive police bail.

Magistrate Bernadette Boss refused bail on Friday, noting the situation following Mr Ulavalu’s death was “a highly volatile one”.

She accepted Turner’s alleged threats to the police officer should be considered credible and expressed concerns about his ease of access to guns.

It was also worrying, Dr Boss said, that Turner did not appear to have been deterred on the weekend by his good-behaviour order.

“It appears the defendant has been unable to control his temper in an emotional situation,” she said.

Turner is due back in court on August 6.