Post Pandemic Practice Profiles – Thelegaltorts

0
23
Post Pandemic Practice Profiles – My Shingle

A year ago this week, the pandemic took the nation by storm. However, at that point, none of us could predict that the novel coronavirus would close courts and endanger many law firms that had not kept up or were unwilling to learn new technology. And so, two months after the pandemic started, I interviewed 14 intrepid solitary and minor attorneys through Zoom to learn how they had weathered the storm and what lay ahead. As you can see from the original interviews, all attorneys had their own way of figuring out how to keep the wheels of justice going and continue to represent clients while making sure their employees stay safe. Some of the lawyers we interviewed had never used Zoom but quickly became experts, while others had operated remotely for years so they never missed a beat. But they all had a mission: that the show must go on.

Now, a year later, we’re checking in with eight of our subjects to see how they fared.

Paul Spitz

Paul Spitz of the law firm Spitz (www.spitzbusinesslaw.com/), specializing in the areas of business / corporate / transactional / startups and licensed as an attorney in Ohio, California.

What surprised you most about the pandemic?

How stupid and selfish people are, how unwilling to make sacrifices and do things for the common good

What was a positive outcome of the pandemic for your practice?

My transition from home to work was pretty seamless, so I think I’m saving a lot of gas

What do you miss most about pre-pandemic practice?

Being with other people, being able to meet people

What is in store for your law firm and the legal profession in general?

Hard to say. I think the legal profession needs to rethink when they have generous office space. At least in corporate work, the trend will continue to not have everyone in the same room and to use tools like Docusign, video calls, etc.

What is a quote or piece of advice that became a mantra or got you through last year?

Just because we work from home doesn’t mean we should always work

Ryan McKeen

Ryan McKeen of the Connecticut Trial Firm (https://cttrialfirm.com) specializes in the personal injury practice and is admitted to the Connecticut bar.

What surprised you most about the pandemic?

The level of connection I was able to maintain with people even though I didn’t see them.

What was a positive outcome of the pandemic for your practice?

Far-off court appearances make life much more sane.

What do you miss most about pre-pandemic practice?

Lunch with people.

What is in store for your law firm and the legal profession in general?

Hopefully more distant hearings and statements.

What is a quote or piece of advice that became a mantra or got you through last year?

Can’t break me

Michael DJ Eisenberg

Michael DJ Eisenberg from the law firm of Michael DJ Eisenberg, attorney and legal advisor (www.eisenberg-lawoffice.com), specializing in the areas of veteran appointment procedures, correction of military documents, military medical / physical bodies and federal employees labor law and admission as a lawyer in all 50 States, DC and PR.

What surprised you most about the pandemic?

How the Department of Veterans Affairs Moved to Online Virtual Hearings.

What was a positive outcome of the pandemic for your practice?

The VA Board of Veterans Appeals appears to have accelerated its operating speed.

What do you miss most about pre-pandemic practice?

Face-to-face meetings.

What is in store for your law firm and the legal profession in general?

As a solo practitioner, I have already worked in a virtual office. This has allowed me to gain a foothold in the totally virtual work lifestyle created by the pandemic. I believe that large law firms, medium-sized law firms, and clients appreciate the logistical and financial efficiency of a virtual working life better. I assume that many companies of all sizes will be able to gain a foothold in the virtual office environment even after the pandemic has ended.

What is a quote or piece of advice that became a mantra or got you through last year?

The working lifestyle may have changed, but legal practice remains the same …

Adam Zuwerink

Adam Zuwerink of West Michigan Law, PC (westmichiganlaw.com) specializes in the estate planning practice and is admitted to the Michigan bar.

What surprised you most about the pandemic?

The wide range of emotions and attitudes of customers regarding public health.

What was a positive outcome of the pandemic for your practice?

Zoom is now an acceptable form of meeting for customers.

What do you miss most about pre-pandemic practice?

Breakfast and lunch with professional referral sources.

What is in store for your law firm and the legal profession in general?

The widespread use of video communication has further reduced geographic boundaries.

Devon Slovensky

Today’s profile is Devon Slovensky of Slovensky Law PLLC (https://slovenskylaw.com/) who specializes in family law practice and is admitted to the Virginia bar.

What surprised you most about the pandemic?

I was surprised at how largely unaffected family law seemed – no big increases or decreases in cases.

What was a positive outcome of the pandemic for your practice?

The best thing for the law that emerged from the pandemic has been the increased uptake of technological solutions for the courts.

What do you miss most about pre-pandemic practice?

I miss seeing my colleagues more regularly and organizing events.

What is in store for your law firm and the legal profession in general?

I will be working remotely more often, and I’m sure other lawyers will too.

What is a quote or advice that became a mantra or got you through last year?

Just keep going

Rebecca Neale

Today’s profile is Rebecca Neale of Bedford Family Lawyer (https://bedfordfamilylawyer.com) who specializes in domestic relations, estate planning and is a Massachusetts lawyer.

What surprised you most about the pandemic?

I am always surprised that the situation is constantly changing. Once we develop a rhythm with work or school, something will change that will force us to evaluate options. Even in 2021, the courts are continuing to change the rules of procedure, getting vaccinations has been stressful, and school schedules have changed too.

What was a positive outcome of the pandemic for your practice?

We optimized our digital paperwork management and internal systems, which was useful. Another positive outcome is the ability to attend hearings and meet with clients through Zoom. I assume that in the future more customers will meet me via Zoom, even if they have the opportunity to come to the office.

What do you miss most about pre-pandemic practice?

I really miss the personal events with my colleagues. In particular, I met up with colleagues in different groups every month and I can’t wait to see myself again in person. Zoom just isn’t the same for socializing.

What is in store for your law firm and the legal profession in general?

I assume that my company will continue to grow. If we streamline our processes and I learn to delegate more, I hope to hire more people. The legal profession is currently at a crossroads. Lawyers who are marginalized mothers but also work from home, and new insights into the effects of racism on the job. I hope the profession will be able to become more welcoming. But the jury is still not informed.

What is a quote or piece of advice that became a mantra or got you through last year?

“We can do hard things” – Glennon Doyle

Liisa spokesman

Liisa spokesperson for Speaker (Speakerlaw.com) law firm, which specializes in the legal remedies practice and is licensed to practice in Michigan.

What surprised you most about the pandemic?

That we worked far longer than I ever expected (I thought 12 weeks was a long time)

What was a positive outcome of the pandemic for your practice?

I have expanded my practice to assist certain litigation attorneys before the case is appealed / needed.

What do you miss most about pre-pandemic practice?

I have my entire team in the office.

What is in store for your law firm and the legal profession in general?

As long as the courts continue to allow remote participation, we can help more people and litigants across the state ahead of the appeal stage. This also saves our clients money when we don’t have to travel for a hearing before the appeals court. I think the courts will be more willing to allow remote participation on a case-by-case basis.

What is a quote or advice that became a mantra or got you through last year?

Pandemic or not, we’re making progress, growing the company and helping more people.

Jeralyn Lawrence

Jeralyn Lawrence

Jeralyn Lawrence of Lawrence Law (www.lawlawfirm.com) specializes in family law practice and is admitted to the New Jersey bar.

What surprised you most about the pandemic?

At first it was terrifying. I was absolutely worried about getting sick and losing my business. I was surprised and grateful at how quickly we and most of the family and divorce lawyers were able to move into the distant world.

What was a positive outcome of the pandemic for your practice?

So many! More time with my family and a lot less stress at work because we don’t rush to court or to meetings. It was more than wonderful not having to fight the traffic or the stress of commuting.

What do you miss most about pre-pandemic practice?

Not very much, but I miss socializing with colleagues and friends.

What is in store for your law firm and the legal profession in general?

After surviving this, I really feel like nothing can stop us. I expect more growth and I firmly believe that our profession will be, in whole or in part, and will remain virtual.

What is a quote or piece of advice that became a mantra or got you through last year?

Take it day after day. Life and business can change in a minute. Be flexible. Believe in you and your team and the sky is the limit.