St Louis legal professionals who pulled a gun on BLM protesters at conflict with neighbors over a ‘sliver of land’

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Mark and Patricia McCloskey, pictured with guns in front of their home on Sunday evening, have been involved in a long-standing row over a 1,143 square foot piece of land near their property

A couple from St. Louis, who made headlines nationwide for standing on their porch with guns against Black Lives Matter protesters, were in a lengthy, armed row with their neighbors.

Mark and Patricia McCloskey, a husband and wife personal injury lawyer duo, were filmed on Sunday evening on demonstrators walking past their villa on their way to Mayor Lyda Krewson's house.

They said they were afraid and would defend their property.

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Mark and Patricia McCloskey, pictured with guns in front of their home on Sunday evening, have been involved in a long-standing row over a 1,143 square foot piece of land near their property

The controversial area around their property in St. Louis is marked in red

The controversial area around their property in St. Louis is marked in red

Personal injury lawyers confronted protesters marching past their home on Sunday

Personal injury lawyers confronted protesters marching past their home on Sunday

But the couple has long been involved in another fight for their home – the one that has been on the St. Louis Circuit Court since 2017 and in which weapons were also drawn.

The trustees of Portland Place, where they live, say they own the "piece of land" next to their house, as described in the assessor's documents more than 116 years ago.

The McCloskeys say, however, that the legal concept of “prejudicial possession” means that they own it – the idea that land can be occupied and owned after many years.

In an affidavit, Mark McCloskey described the country as lying in her block, saying it was one thousand one hundred and forty three (1,143) square feet and north of the sidewalk at Portland Place.

On Monday, judge Joan Moriarty ruled against the McCloskeys' request to end the case without trial, which means the three-year struggle will continue.

McCloskey's home in St. Louis on One Portland Place is in a condominium

McCloskey's home in St. Louis on One Portland Place is in a condominium

& # 39; Between the acquisition of One Portland Place and the construction of the ten-foot wall mentioned above, the McCloskeys regularly prohibited anyone, including Portland Place residents, from crossing the package, including at least one point, and challenged a resident with arms out point that refused to heed the McCloskeys' warnings to stay away from this property, says an affidavit in the lawsuit.

The McCloskeys and trustees have argued about sowing and landscaping, tiles and tuckpointing, and even the "Private Street" sign.

After the lawsuit, received from the St. Louis Post shipping"Mark McCloskey dug up the sign and put it back on the south side of the sidewalk."

McCloskey told CNN Tuesday night that he was afraid of his life from the "crowd" of protesters.

"I was a victim of a mob that came through the gate," he said.

"I didn't care what color they were. I didn't care what their motivation was.

"I was afraid, I was attacked and I was immediately afraid that they would run me over, kill me, burn my house."

McCloskey, 63, rejected the suggestion that it be a symbol for those who opposed Black Lives Matter.

"I'm not the face of anything that resists the Black Lives Matter movement," he said, calling the term "completely ridiculous."

"I was a person who was afraid for my life and protected my wife, my home, my stove and my livelihood."

McCloskeys attorney Albert Watkins in St. Louis said in a statement to the Washington Post that they "acted lawfully" out of "fear and concern."

The confrontation was not racial, he added, and white "agitators" were responsible for provoking the white couple.

"My customers as people with melanin deficiency fully respect the message that Black Lives Matter has to convey, especially to whites," he told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.